Recent Exhibits

Forces of Nature
Works from Rick Peters, Mariana Bartolomeo and Stuart Ross Snider

OPENING NIGHT: Friday June 14th 7:00p.m.

It's opening week here at PAH! We are insanely excited to bring this month's show to all of you fine people of Amarillo. The show features three artists, including long time friend of the Amarillo Art Scene, Rick Peters. Details are below! See you Friday!

Artist mixes macabre, reality in works

An artist with old Amarillo ties will blow back into town Friday, but despite the subject of many of his recent works, he’s not coming in on an ill wind.

Rick Peters, who was Amarillo Museum of Art’s artist in residence from 1994 to 1997, will show his latest works in a show with a pair of Arizona artists at Process Art House, 700 S. Van Buren St.

“Forces of Nature” runs Friday through July 9 at the gallery. The show opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday.

“Rick’s work combines elements of the macabre, the absurd, and the real to create a dynamic and strange view of the world through his art,” PAH owner Jacob Breeden said. “It’s a version of Americana unlike anything else being created here on the High Plains. Rick is constantly exploring the part of the human mind that can’t help but to buy a ticket to the sideshow.”

Peters said early childhood experiences left him with an affinity for the “offbeat or weird,” not to mention scary.

Take, for instance, the series of tornado paintings that will be featured in the show: “Tornadoes, as horrible and as tragic as they are and they’ve been so deadly this spring, (make me) think back to my first notion of a tornado was with Dorothy and ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ where she was transported to a really colorful place.

“That kind of idea, of how the imaginary world collides with the real, seems to lace through my work throughout the years.”

Peters, a Kansas native, came to AMoA thanks to a connection with former curator Patrick McCracken, a fellow University of Kansas graduate.

“I favor that time,” Peters said. “I really do. I always look forward to going back to Amarillo.

“I like the quirkiness of the town,” he continued. “I’m kind of crazy and weird so some of that quirkiness around Amarillo fit me.”

That self-described weirdness comes out in his art, some of which is inspired by sideshow culture and some of which is largely inspired by underground comic book artists like Robert Crumb.

“Confession time: You know, you’re in your younger years and what’s on your mind most of the time? In these comic books, there’s no-holds-barred in subject matter,” he said, subtly referencing the sexual content in such books.

Though some of his works feature nudity or other sexual content, Peters is a little bashful about it.

“There’s a whole scad of them that you couldn’t put in the newspaper and I’m not bringing,” he said. “I self-censor. My father was a minister, and I still go around feeling half-guilty for what I do, but that’s me.”

Peters will be showing with Mariana Bartolomeo and Stuart Ross Snider, a photographer and a sculptor, respectively.

“Rick’s work, paired with Marianna’s photography and Stuart’s sculpture, is setting this exhibit up to be one of the most unique shows here in Amarillo in quite some time,” Breeden said.

Bartolomeo and Peters attended KU together in the early ’80s, she said in an email.

“I think she’s a prodigy,” Peters said. “She’s got a lot (of work) primarily concerned with nature and flowers (that are) photographed in different ways.”

Bartolomeo explained that her works are called “photograms,” an analogue process that allows images to be captured on light-sensitive paper without the use of a camera.

Snider, meanwhile, will display sculptures made from dead wood from high-altitude trees.

“They’re real gnarly and twisted looking,” Peters said. “He’s used all kinds of resins and layers and ends up taking them into another world.”

Peters’ own work is otherworldly, too.

“I think my mother had a lot to do with stimulating my imagination,” he said. “She would haul us in a red Radio Flyer wagon to the movies in the ’50s, way back before I could even walk ... ‘King Kong’ and all of the old sci-fi stuff.

“That left some real impressions on me,” he said. “Anything that was sort of offbeat or weird, that’s what got my attention.”

Passages and New Dimensions
A Culmination of Glass Sculptures from Chad holliday

OPENING NIGHT: Friday May 10th 7:00p.m.

Once again we are approaching opening night at the Art House. This month we are proud to feature the work of Chad Holliday. This is our first exhibition featuring a solo glass artist. And what a show it's turning out to be. Chad's approach to glass is incredibly unique. If you think you know what glass art looks like - drop in this Friday night and find out how much more it can be. Because he does it so well - we are snagging some words about this show from good friend of the arts Chip Chandler. We hope to see you all here Friday night! Doors open at 7:00pm and close at 11:00pm.

Passages and New Dimensions A Culmination of Glass Sculptures from Chad Holliday

By Chip Chandler chip.chandler@amarillo.com

Glass artist Chad Holliday thinks he's cracked the sixth dimension in his latest works. Yes, the sixth. Holliday, an assistant professor of art at West Texas A&M University, will show off the last five years' worth of his work in a show opening Friday at Process Art House, 700 S. Van Buren St.

An opening reception kicks off at 7 p.m. "Passages and New Dimensions: A Culmination of Glass Sculptures from Chad Holliday," which runs through June 11, is an "exploration into extra dimensions," Holliday said. Sculptures, naturally, deal in three dimensions, and the fourth dimension - time - is equally important to the works, Holliday said. But in these works, he's working with interior dimensions in his solid glass castings - what he calls his fifth dimension - and then adding facets to the glass to move light from the inside out - his sixth dimension. "In a sense, it's kind of sculpting with light as the primary medium," Holliday said. "It's more about the essence of the form and trying to give the viewer as much information as possible with as little information as possible - maximizing the potential of the form, basically." "Chad has brought a new energy and conceptual methodology to the sculpture program at WT," gallery owner Jacob Breeden said. "We are proud to feature the amazing diversity represented by his body of work here."

 

City Walls
Works from Rene' West

OPENING NIGHT:

Friday, April 12th 7:00pm - 11:00pm

PAH is proud to present our newest show, City Walls: Photographs from Rene' West. We were priveleged to have an amazing article written by the Amarillo Globe News writer, and dedicated friend of the arts in our area Chip Chandler. It appeared in Sunday's Art Section. I can't say anything about this show better than Chip, so I am including the entire article below. Come out and support one of Amarillo's finest artist/teachers!
Meaning found on 'City Walls'
By Chip Chandler

Photography by Amarillo College instructor Rene West will be on view in "City Walls," opening Friday at Process Art House.

To some eyes, it's graffiti. To others, ghostly remnants of music long gone.
To photographer Rene West, it's art.

West said she's found herself fascinated by the layered remains of concert and political posters glued to walls and telephone poles, sometimes dozens of flyers deep.

"I'm really interested in the interaction between those things ... (where it) all kind of mashes together and overlays and time erodes it," said West, a photography teacher at Amarillo College.

She began photographing those fragments of ideas in 2007. Those works, shot in 25 cities across 15 states in the years since, will be displayed in "City Walls," opening Friday at Process Art House, 700 S. Van Buren St.
The show opens with a 7 p.m. reception. It hangs through May 7.

West said her initial inspiration came while living in Nashville, a half block off of Music Row, where even the alleyways are papered with the posters.
"That's where all the bands like to hang them because that's where the music executives like to park," West said.

Trips to New York and Philadelphia further convinced her that her inspiration had merit, so she continued shooting extreme close-ups of the tattered remains, sometimes holding her camera two inches away from the posters.

"It obsesses me," she said. "I've always been a collagist. ... I love pop culture, I love graphics, textures and text, and I work a lot with tape and like how it overlays on a surface.

"All of this is in these images, so it's just ready-made for me," West said.
Process Art House owner Jacob Breeden said he's taken with West's "sophisticated use of narrative in her photographs and collages."

"The amazing thing about talented photographers is their ability to capture a moment in time and present it through a unique perspective," Breeden said.

"An image makes the move from 'snapshot' to 'art' when it allows the viewer to feel something new - all the while looking at something familiar.

"Rene's work does this in a way that is quite powerful and compelling," he said.

The full article can be found here: http://amarillo.com/ lifestyle/arts/2013-04-05/ meaning-found-city-walls

Coming Undone

Paintings by Kenneth Hall 

"Swooning", Kenneth Hall
Friday, March 8th 2013
7:00pm - 11:00pm
 
Process Art House is proud to announce our newest opening, Coming Undone featuring the works of Iowa based artist Kenneth Hall. 
 
As is our nature at PAH, we will let Kenneth explain his work to you:
 
"My recent paintings invoke the dramatic intensity and pulsing rhythms of 1980's music videos that I used to watch as a teen. I place recognizable figures (or fragments) from Rococo and Baroque master paintings in tumultuous environments, suggesting both raw sensuality and tragedy. Tiepolo, Rembrandt, and Correggio give me beautiful bodies that are being caught up either literally "into the sky" or figuratively "into rapture" as they swoon under the force of seduction. I use these figures as surrogate forms, though - remnants of passion in fractured spaces. They are subsumed by atmospheric gradations of paint and pierced by gestural marks that move through like waves of radiation. They are tragic, being displaced from their own time period. 
The choice of art historical figures brings a rich legacy of meaning; they traditionally symbolize human virtues or the struggle of man to find spiritual significance. They were voluptuous, sensual, and seductive to the viewer (and artist) in their time. Now they stand as ruins, weighted with a bit of nostalgia, but also free to carry new meanings. 
In the non-figurative works I use abstraction to layer and rearrange forms and spaces so that they become imbued with new meanings. I force photoreal elements with decorative hard-edged patterns and more realistic or gestural things so that the difference in perceptual "languages" becomes so strong that it implies a sort of violence. This is the violence that painting does best; paint becoming flesh and paint becoming vapor simultaneously. It is a reminder of the fragility of being human, confined within a body."
 
This show is coming to us all the way from Iowa! We are extremely excited to showcase the work of this talented painter. Come see us next Friday!

 

In Pieces

New Works From Lahib Jaddo

Holding, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 48”x36

Process Art House is proud to welcome Lahib Jaddo to Amarillo for our latest show, In Pieces.The show opens on Friday, December 7th at 7:00pm and we'll clost the evening down at 11:00pm.

We know it's a busy weekend so we will be extending our Saturday hours to 11:00am to 7:00pm to give all you wonderful art lovers a chance to see the show.

We have been fans of Lahib's work for many years here at the Art House and have been anticpating this show since we booked it several months ago. 

Here at PAH we like to let the artist tell you about their work. Here's what Lahib has to say:

I am an artist who was born and raised in the Middle East. When I became of age, I decided to move to the United States wanting the freedom offered for women by this new world.
 
I started my life going to architecture school. And when I worked in the profession, I realized that I had a need to express at a personal level.
 
Art Making satisfies my need to make and express.
 
I make art about the dichotomy of being from two cultures. I express that idea through the veiled woman, and the nude .
 
The “Archetype” in this body of work is inspired by my grandmother who lived all her life in Kirkuk, Iraq. She wore her veil when out of her house  and could not imagine stepping out on to a street without it. I use the veiled woman type in my work  as a metaphor for the past/restrictions/lack of freedom.

The nude with her lack of clothing makes her a universal female, free, and limitless.
 
Veiled women and nude women become part of my vocabulary and their images weave the language I use to tell a narrative of freedom.

 

This is a show we are honored to host here at PAH and we hope you can join us for opening night!

Thanks for supporting art in Amarillo and beyond!!

PAH

 

I am an artist who was born and raised in the Middle East. When I became of age, I decided to move to the United States wanting the freedom offered for women by this new world. I started my life going to architecture school. And when I worked in the profession, I realized that I had a need to express at a personal level. Art Making satisfies my need to make and express. I make art about the dichotomy of being from two cultures. I express that idea through the veiled woman, and the nude . The “Archetype” in this body of work is inspired by my grandmother who lived all her life in Kirkuk, Iraq. She wore her veil when out of her house  and could not imagine stepping out on to a street without it. I use the veiled woman type in my work  as a metaphor for the past/restrictions/lack of freedom. Veiled women and nude women become part of my vocabulary and their images weave the language I use to tell a narrative of freedom.

SUADADE

Works by Ash Marie


WE SHOULD BE STRANGERS

Photographs by Jonathan Phillips

Opening Night Thursday, July 5th from 7:00pm - 10:00pm. 

Image Courtesy of Jonathan Phillips

SHOW REVIEW: "It's a quarter after seven on a Thursday evening at Process Art House.  Jon P's first solo show We Should Be Strangers has been open all of fifteen minutes and I'm already battling a crowd as I enter and begin making a slow lap around the gallery.  I feel my eyes widen with every photograph I encounter.  When I hit the discarded armchair of vibrant orange popping against deep concrete and gravel gray - a hobo's living room, perhaps - I grin from ear to ear for the remainder of the event. 

Within the first row of photos, within my first few moments there, a young boy steps in front of me.  We examine the same piece from very different perspectives.  I'm quite amused to hear him ask his mother, 'Why would someone take a picture of stairs?'  Everybody's a critic, I suppose.  The work in question speaks of unbridled optimism.  I'm placed at the base of a mound of dirt - rock bottom.  A set of industrial stairs lead me to the horizon, exposing only limitless blue sky beyond.  For a moment I question this hope-filled reality's validity.  I'm left wondering if I have hit rock bottom, if I would know it if I had.  Then I, like so many others, am left seeking escape - heavy hearts sighing, wondering if, wishing it could be that easy.

Jon P captures Amarillo's conflicted personality in socioeconomic terms with a photograph of what appears to be, at first glance of shape and color, a barn of rusted sheet metal surrounded by dying grass and scraps of wood.  The artist tells me it's some building at the edge of downtown.  I imagine the high plains opening wide beneath the nation's biggest skies, last-chance gas stations dotting highways that tangent down family farm and ranch dirt roads.  This building, like many of us, is caught somewhere between urban aspirations and rural realities.

A black and white photo of an open door, perhaps a bedroom closet of some abandoned house, only mystery and blackness beyond its frame, foreshadows an isolated exhibit in the gallery's side-pocket room.  Exaggerated by slightly diminished lighting, the pieces here exude a somber, melancholy macabre, as if sliced from reels of silent-era horror films.  One photograph - the shows only deviation from Jon P's clean line motif - hovers above a row of four.  Black birds circle overhead in an ominous gray sky.  I feel I'm watching a scary movie in the dark on the edge of my seat.  This selection of work is at once chilling and exhilarating.

I finish my first of many laps around the gallery and find no dull moments, no lull in the show's energy.  As the alcohol runs dry, a nicotine haze begins building outside, juxtaposing my newfound breathing room within the gallery walls.  The DJ increases his volume to accommodate migrating patrons.  Standing alone amid Jon P's frameless photography, ignoring the Amarillo signposts, I abandon my bearings for New York or Los Angeles or some other cultural Mecca, some artistic community central hub humming and buzzing with light and love and a decided but undetermined course for change.  I confess to Jon P my adoration for his work, my interpretations of his pieces, praising his profound insights and flawless representation of our city.  He tells me, 'I don't see any meaning in any of this.  I'm just trying to capture these fragments of where I am.'"

-Christopher Rigel

 Previous Show:

April 13 - May 28th (EXTENDED SHOW)

RHOPOGRAPHY: DEAD NATURE, LIFE STILL
                          New works from Rafael J. Cañizares-Yunez  

 

Inquiries... Inquiries without clear answers!  It is from this fertile ground that Rafael's  artistic explorations sprout.  His work over the past twenty years has primarily focused on the human preoccupation with the sacred in juxtaposition to the profane, on how this  influences individual and collective thinking, feelings, attitudes, behavior, and identity.  

He investigates these themes through visual metaphors using, for instance, vessels as anthropomorphic representations, exemplified by Rhopography III: Vessels and the other works in this exhibit.

While his work is conceptually fueled by intellectual inquiries, it is formally nurtured by Rafael's aesthetic curiosity and his love for materials and techniques.  He often uses play and improvisation as tools for envisioning and executing the work. 

Compositional elements such as color and scale become guidelines for discovery. The influence which Dada and Surrealism have had on the artist for over twenty years becomes even more evident in this new body of work.  Rafael is treating objects and his own clay works as found objects, charging them with meaning and bringing them together through decisions seemingly guided by unconscious connections and emotional projections; the painterly sculptures "become" as if by chance.

The creative process is, for Rafael, a metaphor for living.  He writes:

 "Creation, circular, unending cycle.

Maker and medium transformed.

Thoughts, words, actions, habits... Become!" 

He sees parallels between the way humans make art and the way we shape our lives... or how life shapes us.

The subject of this exhibit is the still life.  Formally, the works are color studies.  Conceptually, they are dealing with metaphor.

Rhopography, a subcategory of still life, can be described as the representation (or presentation!) of trivial, ordinary, insignificant objects.

Born 1966 in Colombia, South America, Rafael is a visual and performing artist.  He received a Master of Fine Arts in 1997 from the prestigious Cranbrook Academy of Art. His artwork has been exhibited, among other venues, at American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Penn State University, the Allentown Art Museum, and the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

To see examples of Rafael's past work, visit his website: http://www.rafaelcanizares.com/art/Home.html

The show will open at 7:00pm on Friday, April 13th. We hope to see you here at the House!

 

April 13 - May 28th (EXTENDED SHOW)

RHOPOGRAPHY: DEAD NATURE, LIFE STILL
                          New works from Rafael J. Cañizares-Yunez  

 

Inquiries... Inquiries without clear answers!  It is from this fertile ground that Rafael's  artistic explorations sprout.  His work over the past twenty years has primarily focused on the human preoccupation with the sacred in juxtaposition to the profane, on how this  influences individual and collective thinking, feelings, attitudes, behavior, and identity.  

He investigates these themes through visual metaphors using, for instance, vessels as anthropomorphic representations, exemplified by Rhopography III: Vessels and the other works in this exhibit.

While his work is conceptually fueled by intellectual inquiries, it is formally nurtured by Rafael's aesthetic curiosity and his love for materials and techniques.  He often uses play and improvisation as tools for envisioning and executing the work. 

Compositional elements such as color and scale become guidelines for discovery. The influence which Dada and Surrealism have had on the artist for over twenty years becomes even more evident in this new body of work.  Rafael is treating objects and his own clay works as found objects, charging them with meaning and bringing them together through decisions seemingly guided by unconscious connections and emotional projections; the painterly sculptures "become" as if by chance.

The creative process is, for Rafael, a metaphor for living.  He writes:

 "Creation, circular, unending cycle.

Maker and medium transformed.

Thoughts, words, actions, habits... Become!" 

He sees parallels between the way humans make art and the way we shape our lives... or how life shapes us.

The subject of this exhibit is the still life.  Formally, the works are color studies.  Conceptually, they are dealing with metaphor.

Rhopography, a subcategory of still life, can be described as the representation (or presentation!) of trivial, ordinary, insignificant objects.

Born 1966 in Colombia, South America, Rafael is a visual and performing artist.  He received a Master of Fine Arts in 1997 from the prestigious Cranbrook Academy of Art. His artwork has been exhibited, among other venues, at American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Penn State University, the Allentown Art Museum, and the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

To see examples of Rafael's past work, visit his website:http://www.rafaelcanizares.com/art/Home.html

The show will open at 7:00pm on Friday, April 13th. We hope to see you here at the House!

 

December 16th - January 27th

Brian Bussey

Portrait-Brian Bussey

My work maintains a precarious visual balance between my observed reality and figments from an imagined reality.

Perception is always unique to the individual—the way five witnesses to a car accident could have five differing stories to the same event—and I’m simply fascinated with this power of the ambiguous. Dream images play a large role. They have an intangible quality, highly uncertain in meaning but usually striking in their visual presence.

From a pool of imagery I omit what I deem unnecessary, usually suppressing visual cues from observable reality in order to remain true to the odd dimension of dream imagery. The point, for me, is making the intangible nature of my own perceptions more tangible in the form of a two-dimensional surface with stuff on it, creating a material presence that is quite substantial and affirming as an object existing in its own space. The finished painting is then free to be perceived and interpreted at will.

 

 

Art House is proud to announce our first fundraising show for young artists!


Saturday, December 10th from 6:30pm to 9:00pm we will be hosting the San Jacinto Camera Clubhouse and their sponsor, Rene West, an Amarillo College art instructor. In late September a KACV crew came to San Jacinto Elementary School and shot footage of the sponsors working with the kids on the playground, along with interviews with several AC and San Jacinto students about the project. This will air on the artZone, Friday, December 9, at 8pm.

PAH will follow this presentation with an an exhibition / fundraising event on Saturday, December 10 from 6:30 to 9 pm. These 4th and 5th grade students are creating amazing photographs under the tutelage of Ms. West and the AC student sponsors. 

Process Art House believes that our youngest artists are the key to the success of Amarillo's artistic community and to show our support, all proceeds from the evenings event will go directly to the Camera Clubhouse. 

Not only will we be featuring the artwork of these talented young artists, but there will be snacks, prizes, opportunities to see the KACV footage, and of course the chance to meet and show your support of the up and coming creative class of your town!

There is a suggested admission fee of $10 (donated directly to the Clubhouse). Any other donations to the club will be greatly appreciated and put directly to work helping these young people explore the practice of photography!

Please come out and support the next generation of artists at their first big show!

Thank you for your support,

Jacob Breeden - Artist and CEO
Process Art House, LLC.

For more details:
KACV, artZone, Friday, December 9, 8pm
www.kacv.org/artzone

Camera Clubhouse
www.actx.edu/cameraclubhouse

 

 

Recent Exhibit:

Our recent exhibition was titled "Cirque Echo" and featured 17 works from Nacogdoches based artist Tamara Robertson. The show will run from October 14th through November 22nd, 2011.

In her words: 

"Making art has been essential to my life since my earliest memories. Reflecting on the early cavewoman art of my childhood, I find circles to be one of the basic structures that always appeared.This fascination with the circle prevails in my current work. Even if the overall form begins as a traditional rectangle, a radial balance is often part of the design, though sometimes obscurely. To me, circles have their own delicate version of grace and beauty and, like an echo, always return.

When I begin making a new object, I often start by working with a particular shape I wish to incorporate into a piece, or a new surface texture I discovered, or a new material I have found fascinating. I thrive on the influence of my surroundings, thus many of the materials for this show have come from the environment surrounding my studio on the shores of Lake Nacogdoches and the encircling piney woods. I respond to this stimulation with the intuitive part of my brain to invent new techniques, acquire new skills and make each new work innovative to me in some way. My work is fueled by a contrasting variety of concepts such as rusted and shiny, light and heavy, delicate and rugged.

I hope each piece represents something familiar, but unexpected, echoing ordinary things and places while allowing for a mysterious encounter."

Tamara is an artist on the rise. If you missed her show you can still see her work on her website at www.tamararobertsonart.com.